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Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

THE DAGGER: ALTERNATIVE QUEER ARTS PROGRAMMING

In Art, Being Gay, Dating, Gay Celebrity, Gay NYC, Music, Relationships, reviews, sex, television on March 23, 2011 at 4:43 pm

What exactly is “The Dagger?”

Click here for the trailer!

The Dagger is a Queer experimental platform that allows Queer multimedia art projects to evolve and take lives of their own. Regularly scheduled programming will feature short films with musical composition and art direction by none other than Charlie Demos, and videography by the talented I.R. Marin.

See Charlie Demos being interviewed with QUEERAI.

To many, and more to come, The Dagger represents “determination to become courageously close to one’s enemy.” This new program will certainly give the GLBTQ community an alternative platform to experience experimental artistic multimedia.

The Dagger is a crucial “weapon” for GLBTQ people everywhere; it strikes a note toward balancing our representation in the media.

Click here for more on Charlie Demos.

Here it is again … THE DAGGER: EXPERIMENTAL QUEER PROGRAMMING.

Here is MNN.org.

The Dagger will be premiering on public access on March 25, 2011 at 1:00 a.m. – MNN 2 channel 56.

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Ryan Colford has a Glimpse of Man

In Art, Being Gay, Clothing, Dating, Gay Business, Gay NYC, Night Out, NYC, Relationships, sex on May 25, 2010 at 5:32 am

Ryan Colford is a New York City-based fashion and art photographer. He has been published in fashion and lifestyle magazines in America, England and Australia with a variety of features on international and local websites.

Currently, he is simultaneously working on two separate coffee table books. One collection is tentatively titled “The Candy Shoppe,” and blends vibrant colors, sexuality, texture and irreverence. The second is the “Glimpse of Man” collection and is a classic styling of fine art imagery of modern day man exposed.

His artwork has been exhibited in New York galleries and businesses. It has been used for everything from the promotion of art fairs to being auctioned off for charity events. Ryan Colford has also done advertising campaigns for women’s clothing, actors, musicians, key art for movies, corporate and small businesses as well as personalized individual shoots from weddings to specialty concepts.

To me, Colford undoubtedly portrays not only “man” through his eyes, but makes a bold statement about the evolutionary process and how far we have come have as a society.

Let’s get to the Q & A, shall we?

What does Pride mean to you?

It’s funny but Pride means so many things and really it changes depending on where you are at in life. Over the years, it’s changed for me and yet in other ways it’s remained ever the same. 

For me Pride is all about living honestly and openly and loving yourself. I can’t stress the importance of that one sentence! I can’t imagine not being honest about who I am. When I came out at 18, I had to reinforce being proud of myself and to break down doors and stereotypes. I was the ice breaker for my family and quite a few friends!

Now a thousand years later, I have a different perspective. I’m not proud of being gay anymore than I’m proud of having legs or that the sky is blue – for me, it just is. I’m proud of the man that I’ve become and still yet to be.

As a photographer, how have you implemented the idea of being proud into your work?

As an artist, I’m proud of the work that I do that speaks to people on that deep profound deep level. As a gay man, I’m proud of the work that I do that makes people think, that questions their beliefs, that exposes them to imagery they are not familiar with (and maybe uncomfortable with too!)

I think there’s a certain rawness to some of my images that are gay themed. I feel like I pull the shadows away for people and make them realize that at heart we are all the same.

As a gay man, do you feel that your work can be more easily scrutinized than that of a straight man?

I don’t know if it’s more easily scrutinized, but it’s definitely more likely to be classified as gay. I mean a picture of a man (naked or otherwise) isn’t really homoerotic unless he’s maybe sucking dick; it’s up to the interpretation of the viewer. So yeah, I get that reaction from a lot of straight people but I don’t really care. Art is all subjective and I create it because I can’t imagine not doing it.

What has been your favorite photo-shoot to date and why?

Shh, that wouldn’t be nice! It’s funny though, because every artist gets that question in one form or another; seriously though, I don’t have just one (besides you’re only as good as your last photograph).

I have moments though. There are times when I can connect with a model and draw out that creative spark and capture it for the world to see; to show them that beauty, that one amazing image that will always stay with them!

Who would you love to get your claws into and do a photo-shoot with? Why?

The list could be endless from musicians and superstars to men I’ve seen at the gym. I want to shoot so many people … really. I know it’s kind of a pat answer, but I love shooting so much, I can’t imagine just picking one person.

Let me give you a better answer I suppose. It’s more the energy of the model, their look, that certain “it.” Some models just have that light about them that I want to capture that moment in time forever.

Please tell us about your upcoming Pride exhibition:

Gladly! The name of the collection that will be up all month is “Glimpse of Man.” The “Glimpse of Man” series is an intimate and sensual look at the male form. There is an element of barriers removed and inhibitions cast aside. My focus on the male form is to expose the beauty of man without shame. Society and culture has de-sexualized the male form – from the clothing choices to interactions with other men.

One of my main goals is to present a positive and acceptable image of male sexuality. The “Glimpse of Man” is an exploration both for the model and the viewer. Each image has its own context and story that can be felt and interpreted on various levels. I invite the viewer to truly appreciate the life, sexuality, and energy of man.

Of course at midnight one night only, there’s going to be an adult show called “Raw Sugar.” These are selections of shots from “Candy Shoppe” that includes images that have been censored (and some that have not) for one reason or another. So it’s honest and open and blatant! LOL! “The Candy Shoppe” is all about color, texture, vibrancy, sex and fun. Come check it out!

Follow Ryan online:

RyanColford.com

Ryan Colford Photography

A note from the Photographer: “All photography simply involves evoking an emotional response. Whether that response is desire for a product or appreciation of beauty comes from the ability to tell a story with one simple image.” Ryan Colford

The “Glimpse of Man” Gallery Exhibition will be held at 25 Victory Blvd., Staten Island, NY 10301 at 9PM Friday June 4th, 2010.

-Joseph Federico

Photographs courtesy of Ryan Colford Photography, Other information provided by the Downtown Staten Island Council

New York City Boy: Gully is Twinkilicious!

In Art, Being Gay, Clothing, Clubs, Dating, Gay Business, Gay Celebrity, Gay NYC, Hollywood, Literature, Music, Night Out, NYC, Relationships, sex on May 13, 2010 at 5:13 pm

Some of you may have already been invited to join the Facebook group entitled “Gulliver’s Travelog.” This is not your ordinary group, nor is Gulliver your ordinary gay boy. The Facebook group is meant to gather fans and future friends of a young man that took life by the balls and decided to document his adventures every step of the way.

Equal4all: As a gay individual, do you feel that New York City has better opportunities than California?

Gully: There certainly are MORE opportunities. California right now is being ravaged by a piss-poor economy. Also, California is perfect if you’re looking for a job in television or film (or assisting in television or film); try looking for anything else and you’re shit out of luck.

In NYC, I received a job offer (and a job!) just by luck while walking my roomie (and fraternity brother’s) dog. That rarely if ever happens on the streets of LA and thereabouts. Meanwhile, you never know WHO you’ll crash into while you’re going about your day.

E4A: What made you decide to blog about your moving experiences?

G: Well, despite landing a job somewhat quickly, I’ve been having a tough time here in NYC. I figured it would be an excellent way to deal with my trials and tribulations – by documenting them online. It’s also led to a lot of friendships and relationships already. You’d be surprised by the sheer amount of people that have found me through the blog and extended a hand in friendship (you and your blog included!). I’m also a big fan of storytelling, and nothing makes for a better story than actual life.

E4A: What were you doing in California before deciding to make the big move to the Big Apple?

G: To be honest, I was doing nothing …that’s sort of why I moved. Like in the Savannah when a water source dries up, the herds move elsewhere. A potent combination of drama and joblessness, as well as a generous donation from my loving parents enabled me to pick-up and move … something no one thought I’d ever do, and something that everyone said I would quickly regret.

E4A: Tell our readers what the perfect date means to you:

G: A perfect date has a backbone of excellent conversation. I LOVE human interactions. I want my date to be up on pop culture and news. They’d be funny and our jokes would build off of one-another. Maybe we’d see a movie, play, or a musical; we could even go to a museum and have lots to talk about afterwards. I also love walking, so there should be some of that – in a preferably scenic locale such as Central Park or along the Hudson or East Rivers. Good sex is always an added bonus, too…

E4A: Please give advice to someone who may be struggling with who they truly are:

G: I think “who we truly are” is a problematic concept. Our cells live and die every day; after a number of days we are physically and technically a different person. Likewise, I believe who we are is just as fluid and changing.

I say focus on what you’re doing – who you’re with – and spend time creating such things as a statue, a painting, and a poem. We get closest to who we are at that exact moment while we are creating something … it’s not a “window” to the soul, but rather it allows you to chase your creation down to the roots within you that gave rise to what you made. If you spend a lot of time being emo and wondering “who you truly are,” you run the risk of answering the question with “nothing and no one” and that’s scary.

E4A:  Let’s be honest … top or bottom?

G: I’d define myself as a bottom with versatile tendencies … maybe a 75-25 split.

E4A: What can we expect from Gully within the year?

G: That’s a good question! Probably a lot of adventures … I have a habit of getting myself into intriguing situations. It took me a number of years to wear myself ragged in LA, but NYC moves at a far quicker pace. Hopefully I don’t wear out my welcome here too quickly.

People can keep track of me through my blog, my Facebook, and my Twitter. They can also ask me questions like you just did on my Formspring.

Joseph Federico

Glee Interviews: Finn Hudson Dishes to Equal4All!

In Art, Being Gay, Celebrity Interviews, Clothing, Gay Celebrity on May 4, 2010 at 11:25 pm

Cory Monteith of Glee (a.k.a Finn Hudson) took time out of his busy schedule to talk to Equal4All. Monteith plays a character who struggles with who he is, even though he used to rule the school in his jock ways with a gorgeous blond bombshell by his side. Check out what the handsome, fresh actor had to say!

Equal4All: As per your appearance on The View several months ago, you were telling your fans that you auditioned for Glee by playing percussion on Tupperware with pencils. Can you tell us why that was so important in order to get the part of Finn Hudson?

Cory Monteith: The director and producer always told me that I stuck out in their minds BECAUSE I did do that instead of singing for my first audition. Personally, I think that setting yourself apart from other people in auditions or anything really will help you stick out in people’s minds.

E4A: Your character has some underlying issues going on, and one of them is not feeling completely satisfied with who you are. Can you please tell us how you draw out emotion week to week and portray such a complex being?

CM: When I play Finn, I really like to get into his head; I try and feel how he would feel. Like any human, I have had times when I’ve felt like I wasn’t enough, and I wasn’t 100% satisfied with who I am. I just try and tap into Finn’s mind, and my mind, and I guess it works.

E4A: Two words: Kurt Hummel. Tell us how you feel about having a fellow male be completely head over heels for your character?

CM: Honestly, it doesn’t affect me. One thing I love though is that Finn has NO idea. Kurt puts himself out there, and has told Finn how he feels but Finn just doesn’t pay attention.

E4A: Quick, on your toes … Finn Hudson ACTUALLY got a girl pregnant … what would he do?

CM: If Finn actually got a girl pregnant, I think he would just keep doing what he was doing when he thought he had gotten Quinn pregnant – always be there for her, and hold her hand through the way. Finn is just a caring guy, and you really see that when he thinks he is the father.

E4A: Please give advice to anyone who may be struggling with who they truly are:

CM: Always, no matter what, be true to yourself … no matter who that is. You are you for a reason. And never think that you’re not good enough, because if you do then other people may just start thinking that … and who knows, they may even tell you someday.

E4A: Can you offer any juicy gossip about your fellow cast mates?

CM: Ooh, juicy gossip? Well, you guys should know that we all hate each other! Just joking! Honestly, we are like one big happy family; it’s kinda sick actually. The whole cast and crew gets along great.

There ya have it, folks … words straight from Cory Monteith’s mouth to your screen (well, Monteith’s hands to your screen, but whatever)! After the second Glee interview, I’m really starting to think that the cast is made-up of a bunch of sweethearts!

Disclaimer: The above answers may or not be those of the actor Cory Monteith of Glee. It sure as hell sounds like it could be him, don’t you think? Social networking sites have a funny way of taking part in guerilla marketing tactics…

-Joseph Federico

Sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Glee Interviews: Rachel Berry’s Coffee Talk

In Art, Being Gay, Celebrity Interviews, Clubs, concerts, Hollywood, Literature, Music on May 3, 2010 at 4:28 am

When I was a senior in high school, I admittedly opted to take an independent study class – that class was choir. Back then, there were no shows on television such as Glee that my fellow students and I could turn to for support and encouragement. With that being said, that’s why Equal4All did some digging and asked Lea Michele (aka Rachel Berry) to talk to you lovely Gleeks about her roots, how she relates to her character, and then some.

Equal4All: You had your start in Les Misérables; how do you feel that experience has prepared you for playing the role of Rachel Berry?

Lea Michele: Yes, Les Mis was my start. I think by doing this, it helped me get used to performing in front of crowds. My mom used to tell me, “No matter what, do your thing and don’t let ANYONE get you down.” So I generally follow that motto.

E4A: What top qualities of your Glee character can you most identify with?

LM: Hmm, leadership and the controlling factor. That’s pretty much me.

E4A: Rachel Berry has two gay dads and mentions it every chance she gets; how do you feel putting something like that out there with no apologies or regrets is perceived by the fans of the show?

LM: I’m 100% for Gay Rights and such. That’s their decision, and I have NO problem with it.

E4A: When I was in high school, choir wasn’t the most popular extra curricular activity on the list. How do you think Glee is changing the face of high school choirs in this country?

LM: Glee is letting people know that it’s okay to be who you are. Shine and be yourself – don’t change for anyone.

E4A: Please give advice to anyone who may be struggling with who they truly are:

LM: Be yourself! Don’t go around trying to be other people – be the real you. If someone doesn’t accept you for that, then they’re pretty stupid.

E4A: Can you offer fans any juicy details about the upcoming episodes of Glee?

LM: Hmm, well in the next episode airing May 4th in the United States it’s all chaotic! We’re doing a super cool Gaga episode … be sure to tune in!

Isn’t Rachel Berry (I mean Lea Michele) such a doll? I really hope I get a chance to meet her someday … or if not, I guess watching Glee Tuesday nights will have to suffice; I better get my singing voice ready!

If you had the chance, what Glee character or actor/tress would you like to interview? Comments are encouraged below!

Disclaimer: The above answers may or not be those of the actress Lea Michele of Glee. It sure as hell sounds like it could be her, don’t you think? Social networking sites have a funny way of taking part in guerilla marketing tactics…

Joseph Federico

Source 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Summer Shades

In Art, Being Gay, Clothing, Clubs, decor, Gay Celebrity, Night Out, NYC, reviews on April 8, 2010 at 8:58 pm

Sunglasses are meant to protect the eyes, plain and simple. But have you ever wondered when they became so popular and an emblem of one’s status symbol? After some digging around the internet, I found out that it wasn’t until the 1920’s, when movie stars and starlets sported specs on red carpets and to movie premiers that the sunglass movement really took off.

The above mentioned makes 100% sense … even in today’s celebrity-obsessed society, we turn to Hollywood for the latest trends in fashion, music, and the like. With that being said, I always look forward to the changing of one season to another to see what styles are going to be most popular in the upcoming months.

After making contact with international headquarters of major fashion labels, calling the UK, and doing some other personal research of my own, I can now present to you a list of men’s sunglasses that are bound to fly off the shelves this summer. I hope your credit card is paid off and you have some checks coming in because you won’t want to miss out on these select styles.

Ed Hardy- The Director of Key Accounts has promised that the following models this year are customer favorites: EHS040, EHS041, EHS043, and EHS044. These sunglasses range anywhere from $190.00 – $260.00; that may sound a little steep in this economy, but a good, sturdy pair of sunglasses can last a lifetime. The Director personally stated, “We are also launching Affliction Sunwear next month, which will really bring men’s sunglasses to a new level.”

Ray-Ban- According to several internet sources, the Ray-Ban RB 3194 62 is the company’s next most prized possession. These have G15 XLT lenses for ultimate ultra violet protection, which is very important now that we’re smack dab in the midst of global warming and all. The frames seem quite light weight which is good for travel purposes. The new Ray-Bans start off at about $125.00.

Sports Sunglasses- For the sport-loving, rugged type, the X Loop X63 Sunglasses Wrap Style UV400 is going to be the summer’s hot ticket item. With a shatterproof polycarbonate frame, shatterproof polycarbonate lenses, and a 30 day money-back guarantee, I’m sure you can afford the $13.00-$14.00. This specific style can also be purchased over the internet.

Top Man- Any of the current sunglasses on the Top Man website are in style and will be throughout the summer months. May I suggest such names as Black Wrap, Navy Plastic Wrap, and Black Clubman Sunglasses? These styles range from around $24.00-$60.00. Also, if you find yourself in SOHO, New York City, stop in and try some shades on at that location (478 Broadway (between Grand St & Broome St)); it’ll be an adventure, I promise that much.

Personally, I like to stay within budget while shopping around for the perfect seasonal sunglasses but sometimes it’s hard not to splurge. You just might see me picking-up a pair of Ed Hardy’s or even the Sports Sunglasses for my surfing adventures. Either way, I better be the talk of the town … no questions asked.

Edited and written by J. Federico

Project Runway Showcases Mr. Jesse LeNoir

In Art, Being Gay, Clothing, Gay Business, Gay Celebrity, Gay NYC, Hollywood, NYC, television on February 27, 2010 at 8:09 pm

Jesse LeNoir, fashion designer and reality show star. Jesse is an Ohio native who has made it from the Midwest to season seven of Project Runway. As fashion week in New York comes to a close, he gives us an inside look at Project Runway and what it’s like being a fashion designer.

Equal4all: Why did you decide to audition for Project Runway?

Jesse LeNoir: I knew as a designer who hasn’t attended design school, it is really tough to have any credibility or ability to show people what you do; so, I figured that the platform that Project Runway provides was perfect for getting into the industry.

E4A: What do you think Project Runway will do for your career as a fashion designer? 

JL: It is something that I’m hoping will open doors for me to work in the industry under someone I admire, like Tom Ford, or Thom Browne.  And also give me some recognition when I start my own fashion line.

E4A: What is your favorite article of clothing to design and why? 

JL: I love jackets and coats.  I think there’s just so much to them and they really can be the statement piece for an entire look.  I love doing cute dresses, but I think it’s something that I’m good at but so are many other designers.

E4A: If there was something you could change about your performance on the show, what would it be and why? 

JL: My confidence – I think I didn’t sell my work to the judges the way I should have.  I’m finding more and more that I need to just be unapologetic about my work and stand by it and defend it wholeheartedly because I love it completely so nobody can take that away from me.

E4A: What was competing on the show like in comparison to what you thought it was going to be? 

JL: Pretty close to what I expected, except for the talent level I was competing against.  I think the talent in the room was something that was so much stronger than I expected … it was terrifying sometimes.

E4A: What fashion designers do you admire most? Why? 

JL: I love Tom Ford’s work from what he’s done with Gucci, his own line, and now even directing for film – I think he’s truly a visionary and I would love the opportunity to work alongside him and learn from him.

E4A: How do you describe your design style? 

JL: Clean, tailored, and sophisticated.

E4A: Besides you, who do you think was most deserving to win? 

JL: It’s so very hard to pick one person.  I think we all really won being there because we were mostly small designers needing the exposure … so winning the show overall is just icing on the cake.

E4A: Any gossip about the other contestants or the show that you can spill? 

JL: I can’t gossip about other people, that’s just rude … ha ha.  I think the most salacious material will appear on the show so don’t worry.

E4A: Detail what goes through your mind when you are about to be critiqued. 

JL: There’s a certain amount of terror and also just that sort of feeling of having too much to say and not enough time to say it.  I found that I wanted to explain every detail about the design process that I went through and couldn’t so I had to fight to arrange my thoughts to be the most clear and concise.   The adrenaline doesn’t help that thought process either!

E4A: Do you ever feel at a disadvantage because you’re a man and are less familiar with a woman’s shape? 

JL: I think that being a man doesn’t hinder me really.  I think that because when I design, there isn’t any self body image that I’m evaluating the clothes by, so I can really stay focused on the shape of who I’m dressing.  Also, being a straight man I think helps me because I know what I find appealing on a woman and I try to create that.

E4A: How do you feel about the stereotype that all male fashion designers are gay? 

JL: I think there’s definitely a lot of truth to it, but like every rule or stereotype, it’s never 100% accurate.  I think I’m surely a novelty in this industry but there are others and really it doesn’t matter either way.  It’s about the work; an engineer isn’t any better or worse because of his/her sexual orientation so why should this be any different?

E4A: How do you compare yourself to the past Project Runway winners? 

JL: Eh?  I’m doing my own thing for sure.  I think Jeffrey is someone that people would compare me to, but my style is totally different.

E4A: When it came time for you to choose a model, what were you looking for? 

JL: Something interesting in their face that inspired ideas in me.

E4A: What was the best compliment a judge gave you? 

JL:  “I love this look!”

E4A: Who was your favorite celebrity judge? Why? 

JL: Past seasons?  Natalie Portman.  She is someone I would love to dress.  My season?  Probably Georgina Chapman – she was stunning and I like her work.

E4A: Given what you know now, would you compete on Project Runway again? Why? 

JL: Probably; I would definitely be more efficient at it too!  There’s a learning curve for sure.  It’s been a surreal experience overall and something that is an amazing story and novelty in life.

For more information, please go to http://houseofkilroy.com/ or http://jesselenoir.com/

Lindsay Dahlstrom

*Project Runway images provided by of lifetimepress.com*

Photo Sources 1, 2, 3, 4

Dougall Fraser: E4A’s Top Psychic

In Art, Being Gay, Dating, Gay Business, Gay Celebrity, Gay Weddings, Hollywood, Literature, Night Out, Relationships, religions, sex on February 25, 2010 at 5:39 pm

Dougall Fraser is a professional psychic and has recently looked into the future for some of the women on The Real Housewives of Orange County. In this interview, he details how he decided to become a professional psychic, talks about the housewives, and tries to see into his own future.

Equal4all: You recently made an appearance on The Real Housewives of Orange County. Can you tell us a little bit about your experience with the women? Which housewife can you foresee having the most drama in her life in the near future?

Dougall Fraser: When I was invited to appear on RHOC, I honestly thought it would be the easiest job in the world.  I figured that as a gay man, I wouldn’t be threatening to the women and it would be a fun night to connect with them.  Not the case.  The 6 or 7 min segment that aired was a flash of what really was close to two hours.  Most of the women were a bit cold to me with the exception of Tamra and Alexis.  In the end, I think the women were afraid of what I was going to reveal – and in fairness to them, they really had no idea that I was coming.

As far as drama is concerned it’s safe to say that we will see the most drama coming from Gretchens’ life.

E4A: Please tell us a little bit about how you got into the business of being a professional psychic and how you have grown from your career choice:

DF: I don’t think any kid dreams of becoming a professional gypsy.  As the fat, chubby kid on the playground, I was dealing with some intense emotions.  My parents were on the verge of divorce, my sister had leukemia, and I was pretty sure I was gay.  In an effort to avoid my problems, I looked to things like meditation, channeling, crystals, and anything to get out of my head.  I quickly learned that a really fun way to avoid my own problems is to talk about the problems of other people.  This became a little bit of an obsession, something I thought was a hobby.  After years of practice, it coincidentally became my career.  At the age of 20 I came out of the closet, lost a ton of weight, and started taking care of myself emotionally, spiritually, and physically.  I had been reading part time when people asked, and making my living as a massage therapist.  Randomly I was selected the best psychic in Dallas and had an article written about me.  When that publication came out, I went from five readings a month to several readings a day with a three-month waiting list.  For me, this was a huge sign that this work was my destiny.

I feel so lucky to take a peek into peoples lives every day.  My clients are my teachers – I learn from their mistakes.  I share in their joy and their pain.  I get to see such a cross section of people.  It has given me the tools to achieve my goals and to help others achieve theirs.

E4A: In the past, have you been able to foresee important events of your own life? How has being a psychic set you apart from others?

DF: I believe we all have intuition; the only thing that separates me from others is the fact that I listen to it.  The moment I met my husband I heard the words in my head, “You will marry him.”  My second thought was, “God, I must be drunk.”  I wish I could tell you that every day I wake up and have coffee with my spirit guides and they tell me exactly what is going to happen … not the case.  What makes me different is that I pay close attention to my first gut reaction.  I trust what my intuition is saying and keep it in mind.  For example, when I had the psychic impression of who I was to marry, I didn’t blurt it out.  It’s not like the next day I said “Well, I see us getting married.  You should move in!”  Can you imagine?  We dated like normal people and I didn’t tell him for a year that I had that vision.

E4A: How did you realize you were psychic? Did you have a vision when you were younger or is it a family business you just came into?

DF: My family’s business is real estate.  My parents used to say that by the time I was standing in the crib I would talk about colors around people and hearing voices.  Like any good mother, she was positive that I was special.  Like any rational father, I was quickly sent to therapy.  In short, seeing auras, or the energy that surrounds every living thing, has just been as common to me as being left-handed.  I’ve spent years studying energy, color, and light work to define and understand what I was seeing.

E4A: Do you feel that being a psychic and also being gay, that you fit into a certain kind of stereotypical box?

DF: That’s a good question.  I don’t know if I fit into a box – however, I do think society gives permission to women and gay men to be more intuitive.  Feelings, emotions, energy, these are all seen as feminine traits – we always hear about women’s intuition.  I also think that many gay people look outside of traditional religion to find their spirituality.  In the New Age community, all are welcome.

E4A: On your facebook page, it says you are married and he looks like quite the catch. Please tell us how you met your Prince Charming and what married life is like.

DF: OK, moment of truth … David and I met seven years ago in the middle of the night.  It was supposed to be an Internet hookup.  What?  I’m only human.  Anyway, turned out he is the love of my life.

We had our wedding on June 10, 2007 at Bedell Vineyard on Long Island.  We are also one of the 18,000 legally married couples in Los Angeles.

Marriage is so much more than I thought it would be.  It’s very powerful having a co-pilot or equal to share my life with.  We work very hard at inspiring each other to be the best we can possibly be.  In short, I am still smitten with the man – he’s the best.

E4A: If you had the chance to do it all over again, what career path would you choose for yourself?

DF: No regrets … I wouldn’t change a thing.

E4A: How is being a psychic different than taking part in other groups that believe in witchcraft and the occult? Have you ever gotten negative feedback for what you do?

DF: Witchcraft or Paganism is more of a religion and way of life; I haven’t really studied that world very much.  I tend to lean more toward Tibetan Buddhism.  In short, Witchcraft is a Goddess or Earth-based philosophy.  Most of my work deals with the spirit world.

E4A: Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

DF: My career goals are to write my second book, and host a daytime talk show.  I would love to inspire people to look beyond the physical, to see their true selves and find their happiness within.  My personal goals are to continue putting down roots and building a happy life in Los Angeles.

E4A: Please give our readers advice on how to stay true to themselves as members of the GLBT community:

DF: Simply put, be who you are!  I follow a basic metaphysical guideline that energy follows thought and thought directs energy.  So be proud, be powerful, and emit a light from within that says “I am who am I am, and I love myself.”

Dougall Fraser is the author of the memoir: But You Knew That Already: What a Psychic Can Teach You About Life

For more information, please go to: DougallFraser.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/#!/dougallfraser

Twitter: http://twitter.com/DougallFraser

J. Federico

-Television appearance and book cover images of Mr. Fraser provided by Guttman PR-

Photo Sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Valentine’s Day for Singles

In Art, Being Gay, Clubs, Dating, decor, holidays, Hollywood, Literature, Music, Night Out, Relationships, sex on February 12, 2010 at 3:59 am

I’ve only ever been in two relationships in my life, and only was one of those was my high-school girlfriend during the Valentine’s Day hullaballoo. So as one may have guessed, Valentine’s Day is not one of my favorite holidays.

This particular holiday isn’t just for the love birds out there, however. All us single ladies can still have a good time, if not better than all the couples. There is plenty is of stuff to do, for even the broken-hearted “miz-pots,” as my grandmother would call them. Let’s see what all us non-bequeathed can do on this day of sappy emotions and unyielding amount of paper hearts.

#1: MOVIE! They are not just for the couples on Valentine’s Day. If you decide to go it alone, there are plenty of movies out there for all kinds. If you go with a group of friends, I suggest going and seeing something fun – might I suggest Avatar or Tooth Fairy. The romantic comedies will have a fair amount of couples in the theatre, along with horrors and apocalypse movies.

#2: Singles party. And this is not what you are thinking it is. I mean that it’s a party of single guys and/or girls out there. Having a small group of people, nothing bigger than I’d say 5 or 6, over to your apartment with some nice hors d’oeuvres, a nice bottle of wine, or soda for the younger set can mean a nice time for all involved. Hit up your local video store or Netflix if you have the time, and get something that is either predetermined by the group, or you want to surprise people with. If you don’t think that you want love to be your theme, then simply don’t get decorations or a romance-inducing movie.

#3: The Club! Plenty of clubs are having holiday themed parties and specials this weekend, and a lot of them should also be doing Mardi Gras themed parties too. For your local gay bar or club, consult Google.

#4: Go see a show. There are plenty of shows fit for all on Broadway and being put on at thousands of venues throughout the country. If musicals aren’t your thing, there are what we in the industry call straight plays, which there are many out for all to enjoy.

So as you can see, there are so many things that anyone can do on Valentine’s Day. Whether it be throwing a party for you and your friends, or going to the movies, most everyone who is single can still pass the day without being alone.

What will YOU be doing this Valentine’s Day?

Stephen Papallo

Photo Sources 1, 2, 3, 4

Mardi Gras 2010

In Art, Being Gay, Clothing, decor, holidays, Hollywood, Music, Night Out, recipes, religions on February 11, 2010 at 5:09 am

When you think of Mardi Gras, most times the first thing that comes to mind is a crazy party where drunk girls flash themselves in order to attain beads … seems like a far departure from its Catholic origins. Mardi Gras is French for “Fat Tuesday,” which was originally a holiday put in place before Ash Wednesday. Ash Wednesday kick-starts a period of fasting and Fat Tuesday was established as a feasting day where everyone would sit, eat, and drink all day to prepare themselves for the fast.

In the late 1800s, the celebration started to become the Mardi Gras that we know today. They had parades, costumes, masks, and even adopted the official colors; purple, green, and gold (representing justice, faith, and power). Then finally in the 1960s, we started to see the craziness that’s familiar to us today.

My memories of Mardi Gras are probably a little different from the average college girl. I took French growing up in school and every year we would have a Mardi Gras party and plan it for weeks. What I remember most was our homework assignments to create our Mardi Gras masks that we would wear to the party. Mine always ended up being paper mache, painted the Mardi Gras colors, covered in glitter and feathers (fantastic, no?). Then in class, we would all put our masks on, dance around while we listened to French music, eat some cake, and finally crown someone King of the day. Not a bad way to spend a school day.

Throwing a last minute Mardi Gras party? Here are some quick tips:

Decorations—Luckily you’ll probably be able to get everything you need at a party store. If you stick with purple, green, and gold you should be good to go. I’d suggest getting a bunch of beads, feathers and streamers.

Dress—Stick with casual attire that’s comfortable for dancing and partying. You might also want to wear a mask because they’re part of the fun of Mardi Gras.

Food and Drink—A bunch of easy appetizers are probably best, that way you can just put the food out instead of trying to get everyone to sit down at one time, it’s easier on you too. As for a drink, I’d suggest something fruity and fun, but if you’d rather drink something else, go for it.

Music—Whatever music you like is fine to play, but if you want to get into the spirit of things, I’d suggest you put on something fun and light, maybe some Jamaican music.

So what are your thoughts on Mardi Gras?

Lindsay Dahlstrom

Photo Sources 1, 2, 3, 4