equal4all

Archive for the ‘concerts’ Category

Glee Interviews: Rachel Berry’s Coffee Talk

In Art, Being Gay, Celebrity Interviews, Clubs, concerts, Hollywood, Literature, Music on May 3, 2010 at 4:28 am

When I was a senior in high school, I admittedly opted to take an independent study class – that class was choir. Back then, there were no shows on television such as Glee that my fellow students and I could turn to for support and encouragement. With that being said, that’s why Equal4All did some digging and asked Lea Michele (aka Rachel Berry) to talk to you lovely Gleeks about her roots, how she relates to her character, and then some.

Equal4All: You had your start in Les Misérables; how do you feel that experience has prepared you for playing the role of Rachel Berry?

Lea Michele: Yes, Les Mis was my start. I think by doing this, it helped me get used to performing in front of crowds. My mom used to tell me, “No matter what, do your thing and don’t let ANYONE get you down.” So I generally follow that motto.

E4A: What top qualities of your Glee character can you most identify with?

LM: Hmm, leadership and the controlling factor. That’s pretty much me.

E4A: Rachel Berry has two gay dads and mentions it every chance she gets; how do you feel putting something like that out there with no apologies or regrets is perceived by the fans of the show?

LM: I’m 100% for Gay Rights and such. That’s their decision, and I have NO problem with it.

E4A: When I was in high school, choir wasn’t the most popular extra curricular activity on the list. How do you think Glee is changing the face of high school choirs in this country?

LM: Glee is letting people know that it’s okay to be who you are. Shine and be yourself – don’t change for anyone.

E4A: Please give advice to anyone who may be struggling with who they truly are:

LM: Be yourself! Don’t go around trying to be other people – be the real you. If someone doesn’t accept you for that, then they’re pretty stupid.

E4A: Can you offer fans any juicy details about the upcoming episodes of Glee?

LM: Hmm, well in the next episode airing May 4th in the United States it’s all chaotic! We’re doing a super cool Gaga episode … be sure to tune in!

Isn’t Rachel Berry (I mean Lea Michele) such a doll? I really hope I get a chance to meet her someday … or if not, I guess watching Glee Tuesday nights will have to suffice; I better get my singing voice ready!

If you had the chance, what Glee character or actor/tress would you like to interview? Comments are encouraged below!

Disclaimer: The above answers may or not be those of the actress Lea Michele of Glee. It sure as hell sounds like it could be her, don’t you think? Social networking sites have a funny way of taking part in guerilla marketing tactics…

Joseph Federico

Source 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Advertisements

Valentine’s Day Date Ideas

In Being Gay, concerts, Dating, decor, Gay Weddings, holidays, Music, Night Out, Relationships, sex on February 13, 2010 at 6:42 pm

Every year when Valentine’s Day comes around, there’s always that feeling that you need to do something more than just dinner and a movie. This year, Equal4All has compiled a list of simple, different dates so you and your valentine can make the most out of it.

10 things to do together on Valentine’s Day:

Watch the sun rise together. It’s a romantic way to start off the day. Bring your date some of their favorite morning beverages or even breakfast in bed and snuggle together as you watch the sunrise.

Take a trip. Valentine’s Day is part of the weekend this year, and for some it might be longer because of President’s Day, so why don’t you go somewhere for the long weekend? It doesn’t need to be anywhere far or glamorous, just a nice chance to escape the normal everyday routine and be together.

Cook dinner together. Though it might seem more romantic to cook your partner a surprise dinner, it might actually be better if you cook it together. Pick out the menu together, go shopping for it, come back, open a bottle of wine and start cooking. You’ll both have fun while you’re cooking, and even if the meal isn’t the best thing you’ve ever eaten, the fun you had making it will make up for it.

Plan a picnic. If you would still rather surprise your date with a meal, consider turning it into a picnic. Pack it all up with a bottle of wine and a blanket and find somewhere cozy and romantic. If it’s cold where you are, consider setting-up an indoor picnic. You can dim the lights, light some candles, and put on some soft music.

Go see a concert. Seeing a nice show, in a small intimate setting where you can cuddle up listening to music can be very romantic.

Recreate your favorite date. There’s always one date that stands out in a relationship. If you’re in a relationship, you’ve probably had one, so go out and recreate it as a surprise. I’m sure remembering that special day will touch your partner.

Create a spa day. You can either go to the spa and get all the treatments that will relax you and put you in the mood, or you can create a spa day at home. At home, you can give each other manicures, pedicures and massages; just make sure to dim the lights and play soft music so that you get the whole experience.

Scavenger hunt. Leave little notes around the house or town with cute messages for one another that have clues to find the next note. At the end of the scavenger hunt you can be waiting for them with dinner or a gift.

Volunteer together. It may not be the most romantic thing in the world, but Valentine’s Day is about love and sharing your love with others less fortunate is a great thing and will probably draw the two of you closer.

Drive-in movie. Let’s face it, dinner and a movie is a standard date night, and they can get pretty dull. Going to a drive-in is a better alternative. You can bring blankets, pillows, a dinner, and just snuggle up together in privacy – much better than sitting in a crowded theatre with a $7.00 bucket of popcorn.

How will you be spending your day of love?

Lindsay Dahlstrom

Photo Source 1, 2, 3, 4

Glam Rock: A Chat with Robin Fucking Black!

In Art, Being Gay, Clothing, Clubs, concerts, Dating, decor, Gay Business, Gay Celebrity, Gay NYC, Hollywood, Literature, Lounges, Music, Night Out, NYC, Relationships, television on January 20, 2010 at 1:52 am

Glammer Robin Black gushes about his new band, his inspirations, and how he wouldn’t mind makin’ out with a dude … that’s why we love him!

Equal4all: How, when, where and why did Robin Black and the Intergalactic Rock Stars form?

Robin Black: I moved to Toronto in 1998, and found four like-minded glam rockers … we started playing in late ’98. We just wanted to be the kind of flashy, good time, exciting band that you just never saw any more.

E4A: Do you still perform with the boys? Why/Why not?

RB: I still play with “Starboy” Chris Cunnane, the last original member. I have a great new band coming together to tour Canada this spring and the UK this summer. Over time, being in a band is like being married to 5 men of questionable hygiene; you develop different goals in your life. I really appreciate everyone I’ve played with before.

E4A: In the song “More Effeminate Than You,” do you feel that the message is misrepresented in the heterosexual sense or do you not mind how your fans interpret it? To be honest, as a gay man, I thought you were singing about being more of a queen than your supposed boyfriend and absolutely loved the message of “take me as I am!”

RB: I think it’s cool that you see it that way. It was used in the first episode of the North American version of Queer as Folk at the moment when the kid (Justin) was outed at school, with “faggot” spray painted on his (Brian’s) Jeep. It was very powerful, and I was very moved how they used it. The way you viewed it, as a gay man, is exactly how most straights view it … that you are more “femmy” than your partner … for straight guys, it’s about being femmier than their girlfriend. Actually, Starboy wrote most of the lyrics and I usually want to write my own lyrics for his songs, but those were so powerful, and I loved the sentiment, so I just added some of my own…

E4A: Do you get labeled as “gay” or “bi” at all because of the way you dress and act?

RB: I’ve been called “gay” thousands of times. I happen to be a (mostly) straight guy who wears make-up and nail polish and dresses flashy. Rednecks and idiots use the term “gay” as an insult, but I sure as fuck don’t take it as an insult.

E4A: Have you ever had a hot experience with a member of the same sex? Who was it with? Do you regret it? Would you do it again?

RB: There have, in the past, been alchohol-fueled evenings where many people were naked in the same room/bed. You often wondered whose hand was where, etc. I remember, in flashes, a guy watching me roger his wife once. Man, crazy times. But, I haven’t had the man on man experience. I’m pretty into girls. I can’t help it. I was born that way. But I wouldn’t rule it out.

E4A: Please give an average Joe some fashion tips as to how to achieve your look on a regular basis:

RB: Glam rock is about cool clothes and hair, eye make-up, etc., but it is, most importantly, about expressing yourself freely. DO YOUR THING! That’s my tip.

E4A: How’s the marriage going? How’d you meet your blushing rocker-bride? Any kiddies in the future?

RB: Marriage is tough. I’ve been married before. Didn’t work out. We are actually going through a turbulent time. I am a very driven guy who always puts my career (the entertainment business) and my dreams first. It’s not super conducive to great relationships. I am also a hopeless romantic.

E4A: Please give advice to anyone in the GLBT community who is struggling with who they truly are:

RB: It’s tough to be different, but living your life the way you want, instead of by others rules, is worth it no matter how hard it is. Fuck, think of the alternative. DECIDE that you will not spend your years here living for other people’s expectations. Wake up every day and celebrate who you are.

E4A: Who’s your biggest inspiration in the wonderful world of music and glam rock? Is David Bowie aka Ziggy Stardust one of them?

RB: I love Bowie and I love T. Rex. As a kid, I wanted to be just like Billy Idol.

E4A: Comment on how you thought Velvet Goldmine represented the glam rock era. If you didn’t see it, what movie correctly portrays the genre that you perform in?

RB: I loved the look, I loved the music. I thought it really, really felt like the gendre-fucked drug-fueled glam rock days that I imagine in the 70’s. I fucking LOVE Hedwig and Phantom of the Paradise.

E4A: What does Robin Fucking Black have planned for the future?

RB: I am developing a TV series right now. Writing a new record. Touring Canada this year. Touring the UK and Germany in August. I am also fighting my first professional Cage Fight in Ottawa, Ontario on July 26th. Don’t ask. Just hoping to keep life an adventure!

Interview conducted and edited by J. Federico

Photo Sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Taking Woodstock

In Art, Being Gay, Clothing, concerts, Dating, decor, Hollywood, Music, Night Out, Relationships, reviews, sex on October 21, 2009 at 6:36 pm

taking_woodstock

It seemed everywhere you looked this August there was a mention of Woodstock. The 40th anniversary of the festival brought back a lot of memories, most noticeably with the release of Taking Woodstock, the newest movie from the Oscar winning director Ang Lee.

liev_schreiber

Elliot Tiber (Demetri Martin) is the focal point of the story. He unselfishly puts his own life on hold to help his parents avoid the foreclosure of their rundown motel. After being denied loans by several banks, he hears about a music festival that had been cancelled in a nearby town. Thinking the festival would bring in a lot of fast cash for his parents, he schedules it in his town with the help of his neighbor Max Yasgur (Eugene Levy). At this point, the crowds start to roll in, bringing with them plenty of money and drugs, giving Elliot the freedom he always craved, so he could finally become who he really is.

Taking Woodstock is a fun, crazy, coming of age story, and the cast was terrific. Martin plays his character really well; he is awkward and careful … just how you would be if you had never truly been yourself around the people closest to you. Emile Hirsch, who played a troubled Vietnam veteran, was able to convey the psychological pain that many veterans faced after the war, yet still be funny and endearing. Liev Schreiber, who played a cross-dressing bodyguard, stole the movie for me. Not only did he have some of the best lines in the movie, but you looked forward to the time when he was on screen.

emile-hirsch-taking-woodstock_l

If you are looking for a movie about Woodstock that has some clips or reenactments of the performers, this movie isn’t for you. Instead, Woodstock takes a back seat in this film so that it can properly tell Elliot’s story. You do catch a few glimpses of the festival though. In one amazing shot where Elliot takes acid, he climbs to the top of a hill to look over the swaying crowd. Slowly, the crowd starts to evaporate and turn into a wave that you would see in the ocean. This shot was truly magical and made the movie worth seeing!

Overall: B+

-Lindsay Dahlstrom

Photo Source 1, 2, 3

Woodstock 1969 Interviews – The Love Continues…

In Art, Clothing, concerts, Dating, Music, Relationships, sex, television on September 4, 2009 at 3:26 am

Woodstock crowds

August 2009 was the 40th anniversary of Woodstock, one of the greatest concerts and cultural events in history. With almost 500,000 people in attendance and 32 musicians that performed, it won’t ever be forgotten. Today, many of those who were unable to attend look back and wish that they had been there. Instead, they must rely on films and stories to experience it. For those who did attend, like Debbie Goldman Sommer, Roc Ahrensdorf, and Bob Albeck, it will always be a part of them.

How did you first hear about Woodstock and what made you decide to go?

I was 15 years old and my big brother went to a music fest in N.J. I don’t remember exactly where I heard about Woodstock originally, but I remember my discussion with my mother about going. My brother and I both wanted to go but she wouldn’t pay for his ticket. She already paid for his ticket to the fest in N.J. and said it was my turn. It was really the luck of the draw.—Debbie Goldman Sommer

Were there any repercussions either societal or from your family that you felt by going to Woodstock?

No negative repercussions; I was more like a celebrity. A friend came running into my high school speech class, waving a record album, screaming, “Debbie, you’re on the cover!” (The Woodstock LP, naturally).—Debbie Goldman Sommer

Hippies

Tell us the story about how you got there.

A friend and I took off for Woodstock in his VW bug. We had packed food, sleeping bags, etc. and headed off from CT. We got no more than a few miles down I-95, when we hit bumper to bumper traffic due to construction, during which we literally hit the bumper of the car in front of us. It did nothing to that guy’s car, but it smashed in the front of the bug.

The car was still quite drivable, so we were mixed how to handle it. Do we go and say it happened on the way back; or do we call his parents and see what they say? Well, in case the other people happened to call, we decided to call his parents; of course they said come right home.

I was home grumbling about everything, when my mom said, “Just go! I won’t get any peace if you stay home.” So, I hopped in my Corvair, grabbed all of the food, etc, and took off that Friday by myself.

I stuck it out in traffic for hours until I was finally told to park in a field. I went up to a soda stand to get a coke, when the guy said sternly “Do you have a ticket?” I said “No,” (worried he would say I can’t get in), and he said “Great! You don’t need one!”

I had managed to park within a mile of the place! I grabbed what I could carry and walked up to the site. I found a place to set up a lean-to in the woods just at the top of the field. I got my sleeping bag and everything set and went back to the car for food and anything else I might need. I even set up a small campfire in front of the lean-to. I was able to hear everything quite well from there, so I didn’t really need to go out in the throngs unless I wanted to see the bands.

The woods were full of trails with names like “Groovy Way” or “Far Out Path.” At each intersection there were people selling all kinds of recreational drugs like pot, hash, acid, etc. Everything was right out in the open. It was quite a scene!

At one point, some people asked if they could share my fire. I said “Sure!” so they set up camp there. When it started raining, I crashed in my sleeping bag for a while. When I woke up, my little campfire had become a large blaze with many people standing around drying out blankets, clothes, etc. It was amazing how well everyone got along together.

I was pretty stoned for the whole weekend, so I pretty much stayed near my camp. I would sleep off and on, catching different sets along the way. I finally woke up Monday morning around 10am to hear Hendrix play the “Star Spangled Banner”. What a way to wake up! By then there was maybe only around 30,000 people left, which seems like a lot, but compared to what had been there, it seemed empty. After Hendrix finished, I packed up everything and headed home. The traffic home wasn’t bad. It was interesting to see all of the wanderers along the way looking for friends, or their car, etc.—Roc Ahrensdorf

When you first got there and saw all of the people what went through your mind?

Early on, it didn’t strike me as anything too extra phenomenal until dusk, the first night. It became very surreal. People started noticing the magnitude of the crowd. I became somewhat panicky until meeting up with an uncanny amount of people that I knew. I had been separated from the friends I came up with, so it was scary for me. I needed my own space and it was to no avail. By daylight, it was a whole new story. By then I was used to my surroundings.—Debbie Goldman Sommer

Who was the artist that you most enjoyed? Why?

I only stayed for the first night. The conditions were bad with the mud and rain that I left. I remember enjoying Richie Havens.—Bob Albeck

I would have to say Jimi Hendrix. He was all I thought he would be … probably the most incredible guitarist ever. Also, I really loved listening to Sly and the Family Stone. I was dozing off and on, but they seemed to fit in so perfectly with the spirit of the festival.—Debbie Goldman Sommer

I was up in the woods for most of the acts, so I didn’t really “see” much, just heard them. It wasn’t until I saw the movie that I saw what was going on – Sly & the Family Stone, The Who, and Hendrix – were all great.—Roc Ahrensdorf

Did you ever think that 40 years later Woodstock would be remembered the way it is?

I didn’t think so initially but after talking to people, realizing the effect it had on so many of us, and then when the movie came out I knew that it would be remembered for a very long time.—Bob Albeck

When you were there did you ever think that Woodstock would be more than a concert?

Some of the performers tried to tell us, but I thought they were just trying to build more and more spirit due to the weather.—Debbie Goldman Sommer

What can you tell me about the peace and free love?

Most young people were against the war in Vietnam at the time. We were “Peace-niks” so to speak, and I had attended and would attend many anti war demonstrations in NY and other cities. I think this was an undercurrent at Woodstock. As far as free love, I was a bit young to participate but there was some nudity, skinny-dipping etc. that was evident. When I got a bit older I found that people were open to sexual experience and were not as concerned with the spread of STD’s as this was before AIDS.—Bob Albeck

When people look back on Woodstock one thing that stands out is drugs, what can you tell me about that?

There was plenty of pot, hash and acid. I didn’t see anything stronger than that. I imagine there were not too many people there who were not high on something. I don’t remember seeing any alcohol.—Roc Ahrensdorf

Hippies

Why do you think Woodstock is such a celebrated event?

Up until that time, I don’t think that number of people had gotten together without a single act of violence … plus that many incredible musicians and icons together, sharing the same experiences as the audience. Everyone was in awe equally.—Debbie Goldman Sommer

It was celebrated because of the enormity of it and the way we all got along with very few problems at all. This was the largest event of its kind and it affected the people that were there, the locals and the world.—Bob Albeck

Because it was the first thing of its kind. Never before had so many people gathered in one place peacefully, under very trying conditions. The hippie movement had been getting all kinds of negative press. Here were a half a million long hair kids hanging out in mud and rain, with very little food or sanitation, and doing so peacefully. These “hippies” were not so horrible after all.—Roc Ahrensdorf

Could you describe what it felt like to be standing in the rain, mud, and crowd?

It was like being in your first snowball fight – wet and uncomfortable – but you never want it to end!—Debbie Goldman Sommer

If you could go back and do it all over again, would you? Why?

Well I’m 55 and don’t regret much in life, least of all going to Woodstock. At 55, I wouldn’t do well with the bathroom situation nor the dehydration thing. I’ve gotten too accustomed to A/C and ice cubes. However, as for my son, I wish he could have that kind of experience. So the answer to your question is … of course I would do it all over again … back in my youth.—Debbie Goldman Sommer

I would definitely do it again. If I could, I would not get so high, and would have taken advantage of more that was going on. I had my camera with me, but only took four photos. I would wander around much more than I did. It was a lot of fun being part of the whole thing. If I could go back, I might even try to work there to be even more a part of it.—Roc Ahrensdorf

I would do it again. I would have liked to have been a few years older and more mature so I would have appreciated what was happening at the time. The event made me feel a part of a huge brotherhood of people who had similar ideas and values of the times. It made me feel like I belonged to something other than the family that was raising me in the traditional American way.—Bob Albeck

-Interview conducted and written by Lindsay Dahlstrom

Photo Source 1, 2, 3

Top 10 Hippie Songs

In Art, Clothing, concerts, Music, Night Out, Relationships, television on August 27, 2009 at 3:12 pm

hippies

Are you groovy people feeling the peace, love, and happiness in your life yet? With all this talk of Woodstock’s 40th anniversary, Taking Woodstock hitting theaters soon, and E4A running a month-long hippie series, I should hope so! If you aren’t for whatever reason – let’s say the government’s got you down or the war overseas is too much to handle – try burning some jasmine incense and blasting these 10 hippie songs; they’re a surefire way to make you one with your personal earth mother!

10. Woodstock – Joni Mitchell
9. Good Morning Starshine – Oliver
8. Green Tambourine – Lemon Pipers
7. Lady of the Lake – Strawberry Alarm Clock
6. I Dig Rock and Roll Music – Peter, Paul and Mary
5. In a Rainbow – Sweetwater
4. Itchykoo Park – The Small Faces
3. My Generation – The Who
2. White Rabbit – Jefferson Airplane
1. Hari Om – Ravi Shankar

Check out why Woodstock was so big in 1969, and how to turn your room into a Hippie haven!

-J. Federico

Photo Source